Guide to Small Business Insurance – Property, Builders Risk

Small Business Guide – Property Insurance

What types of property do I need to insure? Your business may not possess all the following types of property, but you can use this list to make sure that you have considered all the property categories and any insurance coverage that may be warranted:
  • Buildings and other structures (owned or leased)
  • Furniture, equipment and supplies
  • Inventory
  • Money and securities
  • Records of accounts receivable
  • Improvements and betterments you made to the premises
  • Machinery
  • Boilers
  • Data processing equipment and media (including computers)
  • Valuable papers, books and documents
  • Mobile property such as automobiles, trucks and construction equipment
  • Satellite dishes
  • Signs, fences, and other outdoor property not attached to a building
  • Intangible property (goodwill, trademarks, etc.)
  • Leased equipment
To establish the amount of insurance you need on each, your insurance agent can help you review the types of property you own and their uses. Some of these items are covered in the basic policies. For others, coverage can be added by an endorsement. And some, like money and securities, may not be covered by a standard commercial policy and may require a second, separate policy. Return to Small Business Index What types of property insurance should I consider buying? The best thing to do is to take a complete inventory of all your business property, determine their value and decide if each is worth insuring. Then check to see that the items on the inventory list are included in the basic business property policy and covered for the correct amount. If not, ask your agent about the cost of purchasing additional coverage to meet your needs. You also need to consider your business situation. Are you planning a major expansion? Does your inventory have a decidedly peak season (like a toy store in December)? Or does it fluctuate throughout the year (like a clothing store)? Is your liability limit high enough in light of the new job contract you just signed? Business policies are designed to be added to or subtracted from to meet your needs. Be sure to discuss changes to your business with your agent so that he or she can be sure your policy still provides adequate coverage. Some common additional coverages for business property include (although this list is by no means all-inclusive): Boiler and Machinery Insurance Even if you do not own a boiler, you may need this coverage. The term “boiler and machinery insurance” is gradually being replaced with terms such as “equipment breakdown” or “mechanical breakdown” coverage. This insurance provides coverage against the sudden and accidental breakdown of boilers, machinery or equipment, often including computer systems and telephones/communication systems. Coverage usually includes reimbursement for property damage, expediting expenses (e.g., express transportation charges), and business interruption losses. Builders Risk Coverage Covers buildings in the course of construction. Depending on the policy, this coverage can be for either the building’s value at the time of loss or its full value at the time of completion. Building Ordinance Coverage Provides coverage when a community has a building ordinance stating that when a building is damaged to a specified extent, it must be rebuilt in accordance with current building codes. Special attention is required when establishing the amount of insurance. Business Interruption Insurance Covers the loss of rents or profits plus any continuing expenses while your business is shut down or curtailed as a result of damage or loss of business property. Also typically covered are extra expenses incurred to get back in business as quickly as possible. Commercial Crime Coverages Covers money and securities, stock and fixtures against theft, burglary and robbery both on and off the insured premises and from both employees and outsiders. Excess Debris Removal Coverage Covers the cost of removing debris after damage from fire or other covered peril that requires debris removal before reconstruction of the damaged building can begin. Many policies limit the amount of coverage for debris removal which is often inadequate and must be increased by endorsement. Fidelity Bonds Covers business owners for losses due to dishonest acts by their employees. Inland Marine Insurance Primarily covers property in transit such as from warehouse to warehouse or warehouse to retail store, as well as other people’s property left on your business premises, such as clothes left at a dry cleaning business. Return to Small Business Index How much property insurance do I need to buy? There is no one answer to this because each business is different. You can consult with your Trusted Choice® independent agent on the monetary limits needed to cover your potential for loss. Obviously, a one-person accounting firm will need to purchase less insurance than a store with a substantial inventory. But each will need to make sure that all necessary business property is covered, that the limits of liability are sufficient to protect the owner and the employees, and that loss of income is protected. In addition, each business has unique needs and situations that must be handled. If the store happens to be located on a flood-prone area, the owner should invest in flood insurance. The accountant may wish to purchase reconstruction-of-accounts-receivable insurance to cover the loss of accounting records. The costs of reconstructing those records, money borrowed because of delayed payments due to the records being lost, and lost payments from those clients whose records cannot be reconstructed may be covered. Liability protection also will vary from business to business. A retail business may be more at risk for potential suits than a business that is not open to the public. Also, in some states, courts tend to respond more positively to lawsuits, increasing both the likelihood of successful lawsuits and the amount of damages awarded. In today’s lawsuit-conscious society, higher liability limits are extremely important and relatively inexpensive. The Van Dyk Group can help you decide how much coverage is needed for your particular business. Return to Small Business Index Who decides how much my business property is worth? Property insurance can be purchased on the basis of the property’s actual cash value, on its replacement cost, or on an agreed amount. The differences between the three are: Actual Cash Value The replacement cost of the item minus depreciation. For example, a new desk may cost $500. If your 7-year-old desk gets damaged in a fire, it might have depreciated 50 percent. Therefore, you would be paid $250 for it. Replacement Coverage The cost of replacing an item without deducting for depreciation. So today’s cost for a desk of a size and construction similar to the 7-year-old one damaged by fire would determine the amount of compensation. If it costs $500 today, that would be the replacement coverage. Agreed Amount Art objects, antiques and other unique items are usually insured at an amount agreed upon when the policy is being written. An appraiser values the goods to be insured and the business owner and the insurer agree upon an amount that the insurer will pay if the goods are destroyed due to a covered peril. Check your policy. If you prefer replacement coverage and do not already have it, this coverage can be added to your policy. Inflation-guard coverage, which automatically increases your insurance amount a certain percentage, protects against rising construction costs. Your Trusted Choice® independent agent can advise you of the costs involved. Return to Small Business Index – Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4 | Page 5

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